Robert B. Parkers Wonderland (Spenser, Book 42)

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A developer is trying to buy up Henry's condo on Revere Beach? Soon Spenser and his apprentice, Zebulon Sixkill, are on the trail of a mysterious woman, a megalomaniacal Las Vegas kingpin, and a shady plan to turn a chunk of land north of Boston into a sprawling casino. As alliances shift and twisted dreams surface, the Boston political machine looks to end Spenser's investigation one way or another? It's a magnificent accomplishment that is not to be missed. Parker was the author of seventy books, including the legendary Spenser detective series, the novels featuring police chief Jesse Stone, and the acclaimed Virgil Cole-Everett Hitch westerns, as well as the Sunny Randall novels.

Winner of the Mystery Writers of America Grand Master Award and long considered the undisputed dean of American crime fiction, he died in January In addition, he is the author of several New York Times bestselling novels in the continuation of Robert B. Susan too is on more than one occasion out of character. In fact, of the recurring characters, only Quirk, Belson and Pearl feel anywhere ne Every book is better than the last, but Ace Atkins still doesn't have it right. In fact, of the recurring characters, only Quirk, Belson and Pearl feel anywhere near "correct.

Close, but not quite right. View all 7 comments. May 09, Peter Ackerman rated it liked it.

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The worst Ace Atkins' "Parker" novel for sure. Reading this was like plodding through War and Peace It makes me think Atkins was using Parker's style of writing The only problem is that the logical place where the book would turn towards its' conclusion I think Atkins might have been paid per character as he kept introducing new and returning c The worst Ace Atkins' "Parker" novel for sure. I think Atkins might have been paid per character as he kept introducing new and returning characters up until the final chapters, where finally he introduced us to one of the criminals.

As a person who has read all of Robert B. Parker's books, and the posthumously written ones, by other authors this one seemed to be about one quarter too long. If like me, you are a fan, and just HAVE to keep reading the series, then do, and form your own opinion.

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If you want to be introduced to Spenser, Hawk, Z, and more May 31, Patricia rated it liked it. Close, but not quite. Atkins had the tone right for pages, even chapters, at a time. I'd be reading along quite happily for a time and then a character would say or do something that would remind me that this book was not, in fact, written by the late lamented Parker.

Susan, for example. I've had my issues with her; she often annoyed me. But even at her most annoying she was never vulgar.

As I remarked elsewhere I just didn't find it in character for her to drop the "F bomb" or threaten to kick Close, but not quite. As I remarked elsewhere I just didn't find it in character for her to drop the "F bomb" or threaten to kick someone's ass. Even so, I'll read the next book if Atkins writes one. Even not quite Spenser is better than no Spenser! And I think Atkins has done better than the author who took on Jesse Stone. Those books aren't even close to the real thing, in my opinion. May 13, Stacy Bearse rated it it was amazing Shelves: fiction.

And thank goodness, because the very enjoyable Spenser series has survived Parker's sad passing in In fact, the books are better than ever. This latest installment has all the colorful dialog - witty and irreverent - that characterized Parker's writing. It features a clever plot, written against the backdrop of professional football and the fair city of Boston. It is, however, superb entertainment. May 24, Cheryl rated it it was ok.

Got half-way through and was too bored to finish it. Jun 23, Larry rated it it was amazing. On rereading it a year after the first reading; that's how much I miss Spenser , Ace Atkins's third Spenser book ranks somewhere among Parker's first ten books fourth, maybe. He captures Spenser's voice and methods, and actually improves on Hawk edgier and more deadly , Susan much less irritating , and Zee carrying less in the way of an iconic burden as a Native American character, though he gets a couple of funny lines about his status, one referring to Thanksgiving.

The byplay among Spe On rereading it a year after the first reading; that's how much I miss Spenser , Ace Atkins's third Spenser book ranks somewhere among Parker's first ten books fourth, maybe. The byplay among Spenser, Hawk, Zee, and Susan is smoother, funnier, and more personal than in the last couple of dozen Parkers. The tired racial shtik from the last dozen books is almost gone, and Spenser only refers to Susan as a Jewess once and that one time too many. The plot is more than serviceable, the characters are well drawn even the criminal lowlife types that pop up along the way , and the football superstar who hires Spenser to find his kidnapped son is sympathetically drawn, even when he acts impulsively and is less than honest.

Spenser's observations about people are sharply drawn, as in the first three or four books in Parker's originals. Atkins even reintroduces Spenser's habit of making poetic references Robert Frost and Jack Kerouac quotes that I caught, and there probably are others , much as in the early books.

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They're not pointless, for they tell us soething about Spenser's view of the world that goes beyond his being a wiseass. It's probably a four-star book,but my pleasure on reading the latest of Atkins's attempts the first was very good, the second was so-so leaves me feeling euphoric—as though an old friend several had returned. May 25, Larraine rated it really liked it.

I'm always read for a new Spenser.

Robert B Parker

He writes like the old Parker - the one that actually wrote longer books with more going on and not double spaced large print. Parker was obviously getting tired and obviously unwell.

Robert B. Parker's Wonderland (Spenser, #41) by Ace Atkins

Perhaps he should have taken on a ghost writer - kind of like James Patterson who apparently doesn't write most of his books. James MIchener, supposedly, didn't write a lot of what was penned under his name from wha I'm always read for a new Spenser. James MIchener, supposedly, didn't write a lot of what was penned under his name from what I've read.

The fact is that this isn't great literature. It's strictly escapist. Bad guys vs. We need that. In this latest book, Spenser is approached by a member of the New England Patriots because he thinks somebody is following him around. It soon becomes obvious that there is far more going on. When his son is kidnapped with no ransom demands, Spenser investigates.

For a long time it's fruitless. Then things start to come together Hey, this is fun reading. Our brains need it. For me, it's better than a romance! Oct 16, Mark rated it really liked it. I still miss Robert B. Whenever I would begin reading his latest Spenser novel, I would invariably start it at night, telling myself I would only read a few chapters.

Later, when dawn was breaking and I was reading the final pages, I would wonder ruefully to myself if I would ever learn. However, I'm not so desperate for a hint of Parker's prose that any book with his name on it will do. I once read a chapter from "Robert B. It's not enough to have Parker's name in the title and feature his characters. You have to walk the walk and talk the talk. I'm glad that Spenser is in better hands.


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Now I've just finished "Robert B. Spenser is first hired to investigate a possible threat to star player for the New England Patriots, Kinjo Heywood. What seems like a wild goose chase turns deadly serious when the football player's eight year-old son is kidnapped some time later. Spenser's instincts tell him that there's a link to Kinjo's involvement in a nightclub shooting in New York two years earlier, but not many people are giving straight answers as the gumshoe butts heads with Kinjo's flashy sports agent, his embittered ex-wife, the Patriots' head of security and a corrupt FBI agent with whom Spenser has history.

As days turn into more than a week, the less likely it is that the boy is still alive. Then Kinjo takes a course of action that is straight out of the film "Ransom" and ups the ante even further. Atkins has a good grasp of the individual characters, keeping them fresh and distinct. And he's has done very well in capturing the cadences and rhythms of our main narrator, Spenser, whose gift of wit is very much intact as evidenced in one scene as Spenser waits with state cop Lieutenant Lundquist: "Lundquist and I waited in a sitting room that faced the driveway.

From there, we could see reporters milling under camera lights.